EVA(n) good things are complicated by ethical obligations.

So, this week’s biggest news in terms of the role of artificial intelligence in the practice of law is the rollout of a new, free AI product from ROSS Intelligence.  The product is called EVA, and you can read all about it here.

The short version of it is that when the other side files a brief in your lawsuit, you can upload the brief and EVA will analyze the cases being relied upon, alert you to other cases where those cases have been negatively treated, and point you to other relevant cases to fast track your research efforts.

It sounds great, and it probably is great.  But, me being me, I immediately started thinking about questions such as:

Will ROSS, through EVA, be keeping all of the data that is uploaded to it?

What are the terms and conditions lawyers have to agree to in order to use EVA?

Will those lawyers need their client’s permission to upload such documents into the EVA platform?

Here is a link to those terms and conditions so you can read them yourself should you be so inclined (at that link, you will need to click on the link titled Terms of Use to get those to popup on your screen), but I think the short version is that, almost always, a lawyer can safely make the decision to upload the other side’s brief into EVA without even talking to your client by relying upon the authority provided under Rule 1.6(a) to say that doing so is impliedly authorized in order to carry out the representation of your client.

It is, of course, interesting that what you are uploading is actually the work product of the other side and that the terms and conditions require you to say that you have all the necessary ownership rights to send the document through the EVA service.  Along those lines, I would imagine the weird instances of counsel attempting to claim trademark rights in briefs they file could complicate usage issues.  More realistically though, cases that are operating under protective orders and where briefs are filed under seal would seem to be the one area where lawyers could get themselves into trouble by using the free EVA service.

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