Discipline for entities? Not the answer to any relevant future questions.

It appears somehow that life and practice left me with nothing to post for more than a week now. If I have any readers left, today’s post will be a relatively quick one.

I managed to write a couple ofposts now about one topic that was covered at the APRL mid-year meeting in Las Vegas earlier this year. In keeping with the spirit of not having things that happen in Vegas stay in Vegas this time around, Jayne Reardon a Chicago lawyer who participated in a different panel discussion has put out a new post about the topic of law firm (or entity) regulation over at the Illinois Supreme Court Commission on Professionalism blog, 2Civility. You can read it here.

Now, I do not disagree that aspects of the trend of entity regulation that is taking place with respect to law firms in other countries may have some utility here in the states IF we were to remove barriers to how lawyers and people without law licenses could work together to practice law. Until that happens, it simply isn’t something that is helpful to addressing actual issues. And particularly not if the focus is on discipline.

As the article does acknowledge, the disciplinary rules already provide a means for having members of management and partners in law firms on the hook for discipline in certain circumstances through RPC 5.1. I consider that tool to be more than enough regulation from the disciplinary side of things for many of the examples that Jayne offers in her article to be addressed.

That being said, I absolutely agree that if we could start to see movement toward a more proactive system — like the PMBR course that Jayne discusses that is being implemented in Illinois – then I’d be all for exploring how to move toward a regulatory framework that looks more toward regulation of the entities in which many lawyers practice than merely targeting individual attorneys for discipline.

But, we don’t. We live in a world in which individual attorneys get targeted for discipline. So, today, I’d suggest we all take some time to listen to what this recently disbarred attorney has to say today.

What’s happening in Vegas this week?

So glad you asked. Let me tell you, and tell you why, despite the tried and true adage, it needs to not stay in Vegas.

Later this week the Association of Professional Responsibility Lawyers is having its mid-year meeting in Las Vegas, and we are dedicating our entire programming to a theme: The Future of Lawyering. Under the leadership of former APRL President, Art Lachman, and as I have mentioned in the past, we have launched a Future of Lawyering Committee that is taking a look at potential ways to overhaul certain aspects of the ethics rules.

We will have a day and a half of programming dedicated to that topic. There will be panels discussing each of the following topics:

  • The potential for reform in the 21st Century on issues of cross-border practice
  • How to address “nonlawyer” practice in this modern era.
  • What the practice of law might be like if there was no Model Rule 5.4.
  • The pros and cons of the notion of making having professional liability insurance mandatory for lawyers.
  • What ought to be done, if anything, about changing how law firms are regulated (or not) under the ethics rules
  • Exploring the impact of A.I. on ethical law practice

Oh, and there’s one I left out of that list.

I’m fortunate enough to be involved in one of the panel discussions: “Ethical ‘Evils’ of Referral Fees and For-Profit Referral Services: Time for a Change?” Our panel will be teeing up two possible ideas for things to consider in terms of the restrictions that exist on the ability of lawyers to compensate people and entities who, in one form or fashion or another, refer business to them.

One possibility will be the “radical” notion of what would the rules simply look like if there was no restriction at all in Model Rule 7.2 on providing such compensation? The other possibility will be to look at a proposed new Model Rule 7.7 that yours truly has drafted in the first instance that would seek to permit the wide variety of currently-existing (and recently shut down) on-line matching platforms, and dropping away any concerns about whether such arrangements involve unlawful payments for referrals, as long as the lawyers involved maintain their independent professional judgment, costs of the arrangement aren’t passed on to clients by the lawyer, and the arrangement is transparent to the client.

This combination of programs should make for a very invigorating and enlightening debate on a wide variety of important issues. And, for once, hopefully we will all manage to agree that what happens in Vegas does not just stay in Vegas this time.

In a New York (out-of) state of mind…

It has been a minute or two since I’ve stumbled upon an ethics opinion that provides a quick and easy example of how to take an issue, makes it overly complex and in so doing highlight several ongoing problem areas in the regulation of the profession, but ultimately still get to the correct result as to the “yes” or “no” answer to the question addressed.

But along comes New York State Bar Association Committee on Professional Ethics Opinion No. 1160. This one seems to me to be just such an opinion so let’s chat about it briefly.

Op. 1160 exists to answer the following question:

May a lawyer admitted in New York affiliate and share legal fees with another lawyer, who, while a resident of this State, is not admitted here, with the affiliation intended solely for the purpose of obtaining clients referred by the non-admitted lawyer?

Now, because the question included the desire to share legal fees with the rainmaking lawyer who was living in but not licensed in New York, the opinion could have chosen to cut to the chase based on a relatively straightforward application of New York’s Rule 1.5(g) which largely tracks ABA Model Rule 1.5(e).

New York’s 1.5(g) only lets lawyers not in the same law firm (and to be clear the inquirer’s desire to affiliate did not apparently involve actually forming a law firm together) share legal fees if, among other bells and whistles regarding consent and the existence of a writing, the amount of the division of the fee is either proportional to the service performed or (if it is going to be disproportionate in that respect) if both lawyers assume joint responsibility for the work.

Given that the inquiry transparently admitted that the rainmaker would not be doing anything beyond landing the client and passing the client on to the New York lawyer for handling, it seems pretty clear that Rule 1.5(g) could only be satisfied if the lawyers would be assuming joint responsibility. Given the lack of a New York license for the rainmaker, that would seem an impossible state of affairs because while landing a client might not cross the line into the unauthorized practice of law in New York, agreeing to have joint responsibility for legal work performed in New York for a New York client would be harder to argue involves staying on the right side of the line. Thus, it feels like the NYSBA committee could have wrapped this one up with a bow in a 1 or 2 pages tops.

In fairness, they almost managed to do something like that when they attempted to explain the difference between this situation and an earlier opinion they issued in 2011:

We examined Rule 1.5(g) in N.Y. State 864 (2011), in which the inquirer wished to accept a referral from an out-of-state lawyer in a personal injury matter. The injury occurred in New York and the referring lawyer proposed that, in the particular matter at issue, the in-state lawyer would “handle” the matter and pay the referring lawyer a portion of any recovery. We endorsed the proposal subject to compliance with Rule 1.5(g)…. Although we have declined to delineate the precise contours of “joint responsibility” under this Rule …, we have made clear that the mere cultivation of client relationships does not qualify as “services performed” by the referring lawyer… Thus, the inquirer’s contemplated action would violate Rule 7.2(a) unless it could be said that the inquirer is ethically permitted to be affiliated with the out-of-state lawyer in the circumstances presented.

Where the committee goes awry is that last sentence which is pretty viciously circular.

It seems like it should have said: Thus, the inquirer’s contemplated action would violate Rule 7.2(a) unless it could be said that the out-of-state lawyer was willing to undertake “joint responsibility” for the matter and if doing so would not constitute the unauthorized practice of law.

They did not write it that way, however. And, as a result, the rest of the pieces of the opinion exist all of which for rhetorical purposes treat the rainmaker, despite being a lawyer licensed in at least one jurisdiction, as a “non lawyer.” And much of which bears the hallmarks of heavy-handedness that often arise in ethics opinions construing restrictions on (1) the ability of lawyers to offer compensation to those who refer them work, (2) the ability of lawyers to ask for work from clients; and (3) the ability of lawyers to practice law remotely.

You can read the full opinion here.

My favorite post of 2018

This post (which is not the post referred to in the title) is inspired entirely by something that is done by Nate DiMeo, the wonderful and talented force behind The Memory Palace podcast. (If you’ve never heard it, you are missing out and should grab a few episodes from wherever you download podcasts.)

At the end of the year, he rebroadcasts what is his favorite episode of his podcast performed in the prior year. He manages to do it in a way that is likely much less heavy-handed than I will and also manages to come across entirely self-effacing in evaluating his own content.

I wasn’t entirely sure I could pull something like that off – and still am not so sure — but thanks to the ABA Journal Web 100 recognition this year, there are undoubtedly some new eyeballs at this site that likely didn’t read everything I wrote before that development.

So, with many of the same caveats that Nate offers, here goes. This is not necessarily the best thing I wrote this year or even the thing that sparked the most views or interest, but it is (for a variety of reasons) my favorite post from 2018. It was written in June and was titled: “Time to choose: are you Illinois or New Jersey?” So, in case you missed it the first time, I’m putting it right down below these words without any further editing or re-writing [i.e. warts and all], which might be the hardest part of re-publishing it.

Blackhawks or Devils?

Bulls or Nets?

Barack Obama or Chris Christie?

Northwestern or Rutgers?

Kanye or Wu-Tang Clan?

Wilco or Bruce Springsteen?

Some of those are easy calls; some are harder decisions to make.  What they all have in common though is that one comes out of Illinois and the other comes out of New Jersey.

As to the future of legal ethics, we now face a similar decision that has to be made.  Are you down with what is coming out of Illinois or will you choose what New Jersey has to offer?

I’ll explain further.  Avid readers of this space will be well aware that I have devoted quite a few bits and bytes to discussions of the evolving market for legal services and the push/pull in place between companies that push the envelope of what lawyers can do under existing ethics rules and various ethics opinions that have been released explaining how lawyers can or cannot do business with such companies.  In order to avoid spamming this post with about 10-15 links to previous posts of mine, I’ll just say that if you are just getting here for the first time (welcome!), then look through the older posts for ones with the tag “Future of Legal Ethics” and you are sure to find one pretty quickly that discusses these topics.

Within the last couple of weeks, these have been the two developments that pretty nicely identify the choice that lawyers (and the legal profession) face.

First there is the Illinois development.  The Illinois ARDC — which is Illinois’s regulatory and disciplinary agency [Attorney Registration and Disciplinary Committee] — issued a more than 100-page report making the case for why the ethics rules need to be overhauled to permit lawyers to ethically participate in “lawyer-matching services” such as Avvo and other platforms but that, along with such changes, there need to be regulations adopted to impose certain requirements on such companies and platforms for lawyers to be able to participate.

In large part, much of what Illinois describes sounds a bit like a subtle variation on RPC 7.6 in Tennessee that I have written about in the past.  But it still also requires fundamental changes to other pieces of the ethics rules addressing financial arrangements between lawyers and those not licensed to practice law.

By way of juxtaposition, the New Jersey Supreme Court, asked to review a joint opinion issued by its legal ethics regulatory body, its advertising regulatory body, and its body focused on UPL aligned with other jurisdictions that have issued ethics opinions prohibiting lawyers from participating in programs like Avvo Legal Services, declined to review the opinion or otherwise disagree with its conclusions.

For my part, I think the choice is an easy one to make.

But, the most important thing for today (IMO) is for people to understand that there really is not a middle ground position here — you are going to have to make a choice and you are going to have to decide that you are either on board with the Illinois approach or the New Jersey approach to this topic.

Choose wisely.

A recipe for ethical lawyering?

Now that the Ethics Roadshow is complete in all of the cities where it was staged, I want to repackage the main idea from this year into a post and make a similar ask of my readers that I made of the attendees as to feedback on the point.

The title of the Roadshow this past year was “Back to Basics: Sailing the Five Cs of Ethical Lawyering,” but the main ultimate question or conceit when boiled down was whether the 5 Cs I had identified could provide not only a basic road map for being an ethical lawyer no matter the nature or setting of your practice but could also provide the ingredients of a recipe that can be used to justify the existence of those pieces of the ethics rules that are absolutely worth keeping moving forward in discussions about the future of legal ethics and lawyer regulation. 

The 5 Cs as put forth as the ingredients of the recipe were:

  • Be COMPETENT at what you do
  • Recognize and respect your obligations of CONFIDENTIALITY
  • COMMUNICATE appropriately with your clients (and others) both as to content and frequency
  • Employ CANDOR in all situations in your practice [If you absolutely cannot be 100% truthful, and can’t simply stay silent, then don’t be false.]
  • Avoid CONFLICTS for which you don’t have, or cannot get, consent.

Recognizing that some people might immediately think of another important “C,” avoiding commingling I then offered thoughts about how quite clearly rules about trust accounting could be readily reverse-engineered by combining ingredients.  I initially suggested that Competence + Candor + Communication could do the trick; some others suggested that particularly the requirement to avoid commingling could be described as Candor + Communication + Conflicts.

There are a number of different groups at work on trying to make progress on what the modern regulation of the practice of law should look like.  One of those is APRL’s Future of Lawyering Committee.

I’m fortunate to be a member of that committee and our mission is this:

[T]o explore the evolving nature of technology and its impact on the delivery of legal services and access to justice.  Our goal is to develop specific proposals for amending the legal ethics rules and reforming the lawyer regulatory process.

And so my ask of you is the same as my ask of attendees: Unless a rule is truly, and absolutely, required in order to protect consumers of legal services, shouldn’t the rules worth revisiting be the ones that are hard, if not impossible, to describe using a combination of ingredients from this recipe?

Friday Follow Up: TIKD off at the Wisconsin judicial system

Just two short items by way of follow up from pieces I’ve written about in the past here.

First, I’ve written several different posts about the saga down in Florida that appeared to be one of the first big disputes – post the U.S. Supreme Court decision in the North Carolina Board of Dentistry case –  in which the rise of technology and alternative methods of delivering legal services to consumers would be pitted against traditional bar regulation with antitrust law issues serving as the rules of engagement.  You can read each of those older posts at the links above and this one right here too.

If you haven’t read any of those earlier posts, or don’t know the reference to the Florida litigation, TIKD is an app that you can put on your phone to use to resolve speeding tickets and similar moving violations without ever having to go to court yourself.  It arranges the retention of a lawyer for you and even provides you with a financial guarantee on cost and a promise to pay court fines for you if unsuccessful.  The company behind the app filed an antitrust lawsuit against The Florida Bar and a Florida law firm (The Ticket Clinic) challenging allegedly conspiratorial conduct designed to damage TIKD’s business operations.  I’ve focused so much on the dispute and what its ramifications might be that it would be a pretty big cop out not to mention the fact that the federal district court in Florida issued a 1-page order earlier this month granting the Florida Bar’s motion to dismiss the antitrust claims against it.

It is a classically unsatisfying order for an outsider to litigation to read because it offers no insight into its rationale other than to say it ruled that way based on the “reasons stated at the motions hearing.”  Having followed the events, I would think the reasons have to be a belief that, despite the fact that the Florida Bar regulators include market participants, the regulations they are enforcing are clearly delineated and emanate directly from the Florida Supreme Court.  Assuming there will be an appeal, then there may be more discussion of how this shook out, but, for now, it appears that TIKD’s shot at the regulatory framework in Florida ended up being full of sound and fury but signifying nothing.

Going much back further into the archives, you will find a couple of posts expressing frustration and outrage with a particular Wisconsin lawyer who became infamous (at least for a while) with the release of Netflix’s Making a Murderer documentary.  You can read my original thoughts on the awfulness that was Len Kachinsky’s way of practicing law here and here.

His was a name I was never hoping to run across again so it was quite a roller coaster of emotions to simultaneously learn that Kachinsky had been arrested and charged with stalking but to simultaneously learn he had been acquitted of the charge.  The roller coaster ride went even lower though at the moment the words I was reading about his employment situation fully engulfed me … he had become a municipal judge in Wisconsin.

WT actual F Wisconsin?  Are y’all not even trying?  How can that guy have failed upward into a position in your judiciary?  How is he allowed to preside over any case about any thing?  That’s just a travesty.

Yet another reason for change. Pretty much the most serious reason.

So there are things that can really make you feel small.  And there are things that can really lead to despair and a feeling of helplessness.  Fortunately, there are few things that do both at once.  The report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change can do both of those things pretty simply.  If you haven’t read it, or at least parts of it, you can do so at this link.  If you don’t want to read the report itself (or parts of it), then you can go read one of the many articles discussing at length its sobering warnings of what the future (the close-enough-future that we can imagine ourselves in it pretty easily) here or here or here for example.

You really ought to read as much about it as you can because, to a pretty significant extent, whether we have a habitable planet is just about all that really matters.  And, though the more you digest the news about the situation the easier it is to feel small and helpless, the reaction needs to be significantly different from that.

Why am I writing about this at a legal ethics blog?  (Beyond the cop-out sort of reason in which I would tell you it feels a bit petty to write about anything else given the stakes, of course.)  Well, it isn’t because lawyers are somehow going to save us from this outcome.  For every lawyer out there who lobbies a state legislature to impose some new regulation to try to reduce carbon emissions, there will be another lawyer who ends up representing the industry that seeks to challenge that legislation in court.  That’s the nature of our profession.

But, our profession can try to do a few things to not be part of making the problem worse.

A lot of the discussion about what the future of the practice of law is going to look like involves embracing technology and regulatory questions about ways in which the traditional approach to lawyer regulation may be stifling innovation that would ultimately benefit consumers of legal services.  In my opinion, all of that should continue as quickly as we can move the conversation forward.  But, as we try to talk about what the future of the profession should look like, we ought to be bearing in mind many of these much larger issues.

What can we do to make sure that technological solutions are used so that people in the court system do not have to make multiple, ultimately unnecessary, trips across town for court when nothing happens that couldn’t be handled over the telephone or by video conference or web stream if courts would permit that to occur?

What options should we be considering empowering so that fewer disputes go into the traditional court system at all if they could be resolved through online dispute resolution?  What can we do to try to better fashion courts into places that can themselves be resolving disputes online?

What can we do to persuade those remaining jurisdictions that have been unwilling to move to electronic filing to give up the fight and swiftly enact electronic filing?

Pursuit of these sorts of initiatives can save an incremental number of natural resources.

And, why can our profession readily get comfortable with relaxing the artificial barriers we impose on the ability of a lawyer licensed in one state to actively practice law in another state only in the aftermath of disasters?  Many states have issued ethics opinions in the wake of various weather disasters or passed court rules to permit flexibility for out-of-state lawyers to go to the disaster area and render legal assistance without fear of being accused of unauthorized practice of law.  My own state did so a few years back.

The ABA very recently just issued Formal Ethics Opinion 482 encouraging lawyers to be ready for disasters and to plan ahead to protect their own practice and protect their clients’ cases and matters from adverse impact in the wake of disasters.  The ethics opinion gives very good guidance and, perhaps, it gave that guidance far enough in advance of the devastating impact that Hurricane Michael is currently inflicting on a part of the world where my family has vacationed every summer for the last almost 20 years, Apalachicola and St. George Island, Florida, so that lawyers in that part of the world knew enough to have been prepared in advance.

The IPCC report presents a pretty clear indication of the coming disaster if radical change is not undertaken.  Overhauling the regulation of the legal system to remove artificial barriers to cross-border practice and barriers that prevent technology from making it easier for clients to find lawyers and for lawyers to practice law without unnecessarily wasting resources seem like some things that amount to the least our profession can do to not be part of making worst-case scenarios even more likely to come to pass.

 

 

Information overload; summer struggles.

Mid-August often feels like summer doldrums.  Yet, there has been so much recent information of interest in the world of legal ethics that it is hard to keep up.  Thus, one can manage to feel simultaneously adrift and overloaded.

In that spirit (and because I am that “one”), here are a handful (plus 2) of laconic (if not insightful) entries about important things that have happened of late but that between the constant push/pull of overload and doldrums will not be written about here separately at any great length:

  1.  The competitive space in the legal industry impacted by developments in artificial intelligence and the continued push of providers of legal services other than law firms had a “you got your chocolate in my peanut butter” moment recently with the announcement that one of the Big 4 accounting firms – E&Y – was purchasing Riverview Law, which among other things is responsible for the AI product KIM.  You can read a pretty good summary of what this might mean in the short (and long) term at the first link above and here.
  2. A California Bar task force is undertaking exploration of whether to change rules to permit people other than lawyers to own legal services firms.  This move was prompted by a report the California Bar commissioned from a leading guru, Bill Henderson who you can keep up with here.   Though action from this report could be seismic for the legal profession the task force isn’t scheduled to provide any such report until the end of 2019 by which time, California might not actually be able at the rate things are going to “go first.”
  3. Utah is about to be able to be added to the list of U.S. jurisdictions that allow limited licensing of paralegals so that they can practice certain types of law similar to Washington’s set up for Limited License Legal Technicians (LLLTs).
  4. LegalZoom put out a press release about having received a secondary investment of half a billion dollars in a deal that values it at $2 billion dollars total.  (As the old joke goes, that is a tough amount of money to envision, so try thinking of a billion dollars as being represented by a one-hundred dollar bill and now imagine you had 2 of those!)
  5. A coalition of law firms (including law firm biggie Baker Hostetler – which you might recall as being the first major law firm to sign up with ROSS) and startups in the blockchain space have made a big announcement about an endeavor they intend to launch in October, as Forbes reports, to: “develop a new legal services platform called the Agreements Network. Originally revealed in April, the network is being designed to allow lawyers to perform tasks like managing contracts, leases, and governance documents via smart contracts that are compatible with the public ethereum blockchain.”
  6. The enacted-but-never-implemented “Persuader Rule” that I wrote some about many, many moons ago was rescinded by the Department of Labor, in part, having heard the concerns that were expressed by many over the harm it would inflict on attorney-client privilege and client confidentiality.
  7. And speaking of the intersection of government and legal ethics, the current occupant of The White House speaks of John Dean as if he were a villain in the story of Watergate.  For those of us who focus on legal ethics, and are familiar with the role that the events of Watergate played in the evolution of modern legal ethics, that is a pretty chilling piece of information.

 

The end of Avvo Legal Services should not be the end of the discussion.

A lot of the time, saying something seemed “inevitable,” only makes sense to say when you’ve had the benefit of hindsight.  At some level, every outcome can be justified as having been inevitable when you are doing the justifying after the event has already happened.

I say that to make clear that I understand the problem with making the following assertion:  As soon as the news came out that the same company that owned Martindale Hubbell was buying Avvo, it seemed inevitable that Avvo Legal Services was on the road to being scrapped/shut down.

Further, if the mere news that a much larger, much more “conservative” company was taking over didn’t signal for you how things would shake out ( a company that also owned other significant legal marketing products that might “compete” with or be intended to compete with Avvo), the news that quickly followed — all the key people at Avvo (the founder and CEO, the General Counsel, the marketing person who was to some extent the “face” of Avvo) were cashing out and moving on — should have left no doubt that large change was coming.

This week Internet Brands, that new owner of Avvo, let the cat out of the bag in perhaps the weirdest way possible that Avvo Legal Services would be shut down.  As this ABA Journal article reports, an unauthorized practice of law committee of the North Carolina Bar had sent an inquiry letter, apparently, to continue or begin an evaluation of whether Avvo Legal Services somehow involved the unauthorized practice of law.

In response, the General Counsel of Internet Brands sent the North Carolina committee a letter advising that Avvo Legal Services was going to be shut down imminently.  That’s a weird way for the news to come out because, of all the problems that Avvo Legal Services’s business model had, unauthorized practice of law simply wasn’t one.

If you follow this space, then you are likely well-versed on what those problems were: the business-model required participating lawyers to take on all of the risk that participation would involve them in one or more violations of their state’s ethics rules, including rules against sharing fees with people who aren’t lawyers or paying someone something of a value for a referral of legal work.

The end of Avvo Legal Services, however, should not mean that the legal profession should stop efforts to determine how the ethics rules need to be revised in order to facilitate the existence of things similar to Avvo Legal Services.  Consumers who have grown accustomed to using that kind of platform to get assistance with their legal needs are just going to look around the Internet for a new option.

One of the folks behind Avvo has been promoting the existence of one such new option pretty vigorously of late.  But there are all kinds of others out there and likely new ones waiting in the wings.  Very few, if any, of them can truly be described as providing any sort of service that is likely to hurt consumers seeking legal services.  Real-world transactions have demonstrated that the kind of approach to pairing consumers in need of help with lawyers with time on their hands and a willingness to assist at a desirable price point can take place without hurting the consumers of legal services.  The fact that those business models are currently prohibited by the ethics rules simply means that slavish devotion to those prohibitions based on theoretical concerns rather than how things truly are is an untenable position for the profession to try to maintain.

I still think a big choice has to be made in our profession, and I continue to think that choice is clear.

Time to choose: are you Illinois or New Jersey?

Blackhawks or Devils?

Bulls or Nets?

Barack Obama or Chris Christie?

Northwestern or Rutgers?

Kanye or Wu-Tang Clan?

Wilco or Bruce Springsteen?

Some of those are easy calls; some are harder decisions to make.  What they all have in common though is that one comes out of Illinois and the other comes out of New Jersey.

As to the future of legal ethics, we now face a similar decision that has to be made.  Are you down with what is coming out of Illinois or will you choose what New Jersey has to offer?

I’ll explain further.  Avid readers of this space will be well aware that I have devoted quite a few bits and bytes to discussions of the evolving market for legal services and the push/pull in place between companies that push the envelope of what lawyers can do under existing ethics rules and various ethics opinions that have been released explaining how lawyers can or cannot do business with such companies.  In order to avoid spamming this post with about 10-15 links to previous posts of mine, I’ll just say that if you are just getting here for the first time (welcome!), then look through the older posts for ones with the tag “Future of Legal Ethics” and you are sure to find one pretty quickly that discusses these topics.

Within the last couple of weeks, these have been the two developments that pretty nicely identify the choice that lawyers (and the legal profession) face.

First there is the Illinois development.  The Illinois ARDC — which is Illinois’s regulatory and disciplinary agency [Attorney Registration and Disciplinary Committee] — issued a more than 100-page report making the case for why the ethics rules need to be overhauled to permit lawyers to ethically participate in “lawyer-matching services” such as Avvo and other platforms but that, along with such changes, there need to be regulations adopted to impose certain requirements on such companies and platforms for lawyers to be able to participate.

In large part, much of what Illinois describes sounds a bit like a subtle variation on RPC 7.6 in Tennessee that I have written about in the past.  But it still also requires fundamental changes to other pieces of the ethics rules addressing financial arrangements between lawyers and those not licensed to practice law.

By way of juxtaposition, the New Jersey Supreme Court, asked to review a joint opinion issued by its legal ethics regulatory body, its advertising regulatory body, and its body focused on UPL aligned with other jurisdictions that have issued ethics opinions prohibiting lawyers from participating in programs like Avvo Legal Services, declined to review the opinion or otherwise disagree with its conclusions.

For my part, I think the choice is an easy one to make.

But, the most important thing for today (IMO) is for people to understand that there really is not a middle ground position here — you are going to have to make a choice and you are going to have to decide that you are either on board with the Illinois approach or the New Jersey approach to this topic.

Choose wisely.