The “Now You Know” ad – quite savvy or absolutely horrible?

I had been hoping I could wait a bit to write about this topic but it’s making news via the ABA Journal online today, so I’ll just plow in with this rush job of a post because I’ve already heard discussions in Tennessee about this same ad and before someone more articulate than me blogs about it before I do.

Here’s a link to the article about the Georgia dust up:.

Here, if I’ve done this correctly should be able to watch the advertisement itself at this link — “Now You Know”

For those who can’t get the video to play or who didn’t read the Georgia story above, the gist is that the advertisement explains that the fact that someone has insurance to cover liability in say an auto accident case is something that gets withheld from the jury.  (For what it is worth to those outside Tennessee, in our state insurance coverage is not even discoverable in state court although it is, of course, in federal court.)

Now, based on someone asking me about it, I thought it was already running in Tennessee, but it may only be up in Georgia at the moment.

I’m not at all prepared to weigh in on whether it presents a problem under Georgia’s advertising rules, but I feel pretty comfortable saying that it would be difficult in Tennessee to make the case that the advertisement violates any of our ethics rules.  On the first front, it is hard to point directly at any aspect of the content that would be untruthful so challenges under RPC 7.1 or similar provisions would go nowhere.  Someone might argue that the ad puts a lawyer in the position of doing something “prejudicial to the administration of justice,” in violation of RPC 8.4(d) but the natural retort to that would be, well… is it … really?  And, I suspect that the firm running the advertisement would very much like to spend time debating whether the dissemination of the information is really prejudicial to the administration of justice or not.

If there is a provision that could be fruitfully pursued, I tend to think it would be RPC 3.6(a) which prohibits lawyers from making “an extrajudicial statement that the lawyer knows or reasonably should know will be disseminated by means of public communication and will have a substantial likelihood of materially prejudicing an adjudicative proceeding in the matter.”  That rule is usually thought of as being designed to protect against publicity that would impact a particular matter, but a statement like this that would apply to all matters to some extent might just be capable of being argued to have sufficient deleterious impact to any one matter to trigger the rule.

I tend to believe that the best response to speech though is more speech, so what I’d really like to see is a defense-oriented firm cut an ad to educate the public about something like the collateral source rule.  Someone could even try to argue that RPC 3.6(c) which permits some responsive statements in order to “protect a client from the substantial undue prejudicial effect of recent publicity not initiated by the lawyer or the lawyer’s client.”

It’d be interesting to see that play out and whether  the firm strenuously defending this current advertisement would see any problems with a defense-oriented counterpoint.

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *