Where are we when even ABA Ethics Opinions are marketed with a “clickbait” approach?

So, as promised (and even though there have been even further developments down in Florida), today I am writing about the latest ABA Ethics Opinion and whether it might provide any solace and protection for a lawyer who is being dragged by a former client online and wanting to defend herself by responding online to try to set the “record” straight.

The ABA Ethics Opinion in question is Formal Op. 479, and the answer is “no, no it doesn’t.”

Before I elaborate on that, I really do want to vent a bit (hopefully without sounding too much like Andy Rooney because I’m only 44) about the way people rolled out the release of this ethics opinion.

The ABA Journal online gave it a headline reading: “Can news on social media be ‘generally known’?  ABA Opinion considers confidentiality exception”

This then was, of course, picked up in other places, Law360 went with “Social Media Can Create Confidentiality Exception, ABA Says.”

Then I saw some lawyers on social media (lawyers who certainly should know better since they were actually involved in the opinion itself) teasing the opinion in a similar fashion.

If you actually read the opinion, you wonder what in the world anyone was even talking about.  The term “social media” does appear in the opinion.  Once.  On p. 5, in this sentence, “Information may become widely recognized and thus generally known as a result of publicity through traditional media sources, such as newspapers, magazines, radio, or television; through publication on internet web sites; or through social media.”

That is not a groundbreaking statement of any sort.  It’s common sense.  It also is nowhere near the actual, helpful or relevant, takeaway of the opinion.

The takeaway of the opinion is clearly the following (forceful) reminder about how stark the obligation of lawyers to protect confidential information about even a former client is:

Unless information has become widely recognized by the public (for example by having achieved public notoriety), or within the former client’s industry, profession, or trade, the fact that the information may have been discussed in open court, or may be available in court records, in public libraries, or in other public repositories does not, standing alone, mean that the information is generally known for Model Rule 1.9(c)(1) purposes.  Information that is publicly available is not necessarily generally known.  Certainly, if information is publicly available but requires specialized knowledge or expertise to locate, it is not generally known within the meaning of Model Rule 1.9(c)(1).

Don’t get me wrong.  It is actually a really good ethics opinion, and it gives timely advice that lawyers need to take to heart to make sure they stay in compliance with their obligations.  It’s just a shame it was rolled out with a “click-bait and switch” message.  We’d all have been better off if it had been rolled out with the headline:  “ABA Opinion reminds lawyers that just because information about a former client has been publicized doesn’t mean it is ‘generally known.'”

And, to actually deliver on my promised topic, here’s why nothing about this opinion is going to help any lawyer who finds herself in a situation where a former client has posted something, somewhere disparaging the lawyer in a way that the lawyer thinks is unfair and she wants to respond to clear up the record by disclosing other information about the representation that puts it in context: the details that the lawyer wants to reveal to provide context won’t have been disclosed by the former client and, thus, even if the lawyer could try to claim that what the former client has said is now “generally known,” the bits he hasn’t said most certainly are not.

Thus, unless and until some exception is created in the ethics rules to allow responses to online criticism under Rule 1.6 (which I’m not necessarily advocating for), lawyers who opt to get into it with former clients (or even clients) online will need to be very careful about what they say.  Otherwise, they will find themselves in trouble – as did this South Carolina lawyer who was brought to my attention by the always wonderful Roy Simon  (Admittedly, the SC lawyer had more problems than loose lips online, but that was one of the problems all the same.)

(And, so as not to be accused of my own “bait and switch” situation, I will take a stab at juxtaposing this opinion with Opinion 478 which also came out recently.  If the treatment of the two opinions was consistent, 478 would have been rolled out by the ABA Journal with the headline:  “ABA Ethics Opinion tells judges not to go online.”

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