Categories
. Legal ethics

It’s another fine day to abolish the bar exam.

Now is another of the various times of year throughout the nation when law school graduates finish waiting anxiously for bar results and find out whether they passed and get the opportunity to start digging their way out of the debt they amassed in law school or failed and, thus, have to wrestle with the […]

Categories
. Legal ethics

The scams evolve. So too must lawyers.

I mentioned in a prior post that I was going to be fortunate enough to preside over the first in-person meeting of APRL in many, many moons last week. I’ve also written in the past about APRL has begun working into its programming items we call “Fred Talks.” These are Focused. Rapid. Ethics. Discussions. Shorter […]

Categories
. Legal ethics

Florida is a hopeless place.

No, I’m not going to have to get into talking about that it has a joke of a governor and has been actively trying to not make decisions in the best interest of public health during a crisis. I’m just going to focus on two developments in the legal ethics space that have occurred in […]

Categories
Judicial Ethics

NFT = No From Tennessee

I am about to write a series of statements that are each fairly described as, if you will allow me to use the technical, legal term, “bananas.” People with way too much money on their hands are spending actual money on things called Non-Fungible Tokens (“NFTs”). NFTs are – in laymen’s terms – unique electronic-only […]

Categories
. Legal ethics

Brooding about ethics.

So, it’s been a minute or so since my last content. You’ve probably moved on and found a new favorite ethics blog. It’s probably Michael Kennedy’s actually, he’s been relentless with content in March 2021. You might be wondering what has happened to keep me from writing over these last 20 or so days. First, […]

Categories
Judicial Ethics

It’s always easy to get distracted by the cat.

So, if you’re involved in the legal profession, one thing was guaranteed to make it into your email inbox or social media feed or both. And, no, it wasn’t even the atrocious lawyering that was on display in the defense in Washington, D.C. of a former social media influencer. It was undoubtedly the 34 second […]

Categories
. Legal ethics

Pennsylvania wins the race to be first with COVID-19 ethics guidance.

I’ve lived in Memphis since 5th grade at this point, but I was actually born in Pennsylvania. I’ll heed all the guidance making the rounds of social media about not sharing information that might be a security question somewhere and won’t tell you what city. But a part of my heart will always be in […]

Categories
. Legal ethics

Lawyers continue to struggle with tackling online negative reviews.

Today’s topic come up again for two different reasons. First, because the North Carolina State Bar has put out a new proposed ethics opinion seeking public comment about the topic. Second, because it was also discussed at one of the presentations made at the APRL mid-year meeting a week or so ago. As the title […]

Categories
. Legal ethics

WhatsApp at Atrium? A lot, but also WhatsApp with you?

Now, I’m certain the 5 or 6 of you still left who haven’t been alienated by the long hiatus are a bit miffed about the lack of content over the last couple of weeks. Fair, but technically there has been new content posted to the blog first on January 10 and then on January 12, […]

Categories
. Legal ethics

The perils of letting your clients speak for themselves.

I’ve been known in the past when writing or speaking about Model Rule 4.2 and the restrictions it imposes to make the point that our ethics rule treats grown up adults as incapable of making decisions for themselves. Mostly jokingly I make that point. When elaborating it is merely to focus on the idea that […]