Categories
Legal ethics

Dot. Dot.Dash (3 updates)

Three updates for you on things that all managed to catch my eye at the same time and all fall into the “I’ve written about this before” category. First, there has now been a ruling in that MSG case where the lawyers for MSG were badly misusing RPC 4.2 to justify barring certain attorneys from […]

Categories
Legal ethics

New York Disbarment Speedrun

Now to get the obvious first question out of the way: “speedrun” is a term that gamers use to refer to tackling a video game in a manner where the goal is to try to just complete the whole thing as quickly as possible rather than worrying about high scores. If you want to do […]

Categories
Legal ethics

Rare but not unprecedented.

So, apologies all around. For those seeking out new content from me, I apologize for the brief hiatus. For those who hoped I’d stop at 500 posts, I apologize because for not stopping. For the first of what I hope will be at least another 500, let’s talk about a recent disbarment action that involves […]

Categories
Legal ethics

Sorry to “ghost” on everybody

Life remains crazy for many, and the pandemic just doesn’t seem to have any intention of ending before it can have an extended Season 3 storyline. I almost hate to write these words and “jinx” it but my wife, my children, and I have continued to be able to avoid contracting Covid-19, but that doesn’t […]

Categories
. Legal ethics

A cautionary tale of sorts for solos

It was many, many years ago (almost exactly 5 years ago) that I wrote a bit about how important it can be for lawyers who have solo practices to have contingency plans in place in case something suddenly happens to them in order to provide a way for their clients to be protected. As we […]

Categories
. Legal ethics

Truth is stranger than fiction.

This is not a post about politics in the United States, though the title of the post might make it seem like it could be. This is instead a post that has to be written because I saw a headline and thought, “well that has to be fodder for a post,” and then it turned […]

Categories
. Legal ethics

The era of permanent disbarment in TN has begun.

What now seems like an eternity ago, because it was written in the before-times, I wrote about Tennessee’s change to its disciplinary procedural rules resulting in implementation of permanent disbarment. I questioned exactly why the change was needed and what it would mean given that it was being paired with changes to extend the maximum […]

Categories
. Legal ethics

PDA: If you’re going to get disbarred in TN, get it done before July 1, 2020.

Because if you can get it finalized by June 30, then you might still have the chance to be reinstated starting July 1, 2025. In this instance, PDA is short for “public disservice announcement,” not “public display of affection.” You might remember back last year I wrote about a proposed revision to the rules of […]

Categories
. Legal ethics

Two updates: Ruff[alo]ed feathers in Georgia & Piercing personal jurisdiction in California

Apologies for the drought in content over the last little bit as I’ve been traveling my state for my Ethics Roadshow doing a three-hour presentation in four cities about what I think the future looks like for those who will still be practicing in 2025. For today, two updates of note that involve important, ongoing […]

Categories
. Legal ethics

A companion piece.

As I inch ever closer to my 400th blogpost here, today’s offering is something of a companion piece to a post I wrote almost exactly 13 months ago that demonstrates what should be an obvious point, what is a very important point in the world of disciplinary defense but much less obvious, and at least […]