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. Legal ethics

But why though?

This past week the Tennessee Supreme Court proposed revisions to the rules of disciplinary enforcement that would transform disbarment into an irrevocable form of discipline in Tennessee and that would extend the potential length of a suspension from 5 years maximum to 10 years maximum. Which leads me to the highly-technical title of this post: […]

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. Legal ethics

Tales of typos and punctuation problems.

I’ve written once or twice in the past about how questions of punctuation and typographical error can be unimportant when the issue amounts only to pedantry. Of course, punctuation can be very important. The stage phenomenon Hamilton has a good line or two about this involving “My dearest Angelica. With a comma after dearest, you’ve […]

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. Legal ethics

Nearly four years later… and I’m making that James Bond reference this time.

So, if any of you are still around these parts after I’ve gone some 12 days without writing any content, then you are in for me dredging someone up that I previously wrote about on June 30, 2015. An attorney named Rodger Moore. Rodger Moore. And he was suspended for the practice of law for […]

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. Legal ethics

Discipline for entities? Not the answer to any relevant future questions.

It appears somehow that life and practice left me with nothing to post for more than a week now. If I have any readers left, today’s post will be a relatively quick one. I managed to write a couple ofposts now about one topic that was covered at the APRL mid-year meeting in Las Vegas […]

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. Legal ethics

Friday Follow Up: Despite “Full Stop,” lawyer still might not stop.

Last year, I wrote about the curious case of a Tennessee lawyer who demonstrated that while it is difficult to get disbarred over a conflict, it is not impossible. You do have to try really, really hard though. Perhaps not surprisingly, the lawyer’s Quixotic continuing violation of the First Rule of Holes had at least […]

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. Legal ethics

Not all who wear capes are heroes.

This really is just too absurd not to write about.  The absurd story commanding my fingers to tap these keys today involves a lawyer who managed to blow some significant aspects of the fundamentals of being an ethical lawyer.  You may have seen the ABA Journal online story about the now-disbarred lawyer whose absurd story is commanding […]

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. Legal ethics

Nebraska demonstrating less patience than Tennessee

Although I live in SEC country, I am a Chelsea FC fan rather than a follower of college football.  So this is not a sly college football reference in my title.  (I am aware that apparently UT lost its first game of the season but have literally no idea whether the Cornhuskers have even played […]

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. Legal ethics

Can’t stop, won’t stop. Now … full stop.

I’m really, truly not trying to fall into the habit of only managing one post a week.  As proof, here’s a post about a Tennessee lawyer who couldn’t/wouldn’t follow the rules. It is a fascinating case study for at least two reasons.  One is that discipline for conflicts of interest is, all things considered, relatively […]

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. Legal ethics

That escalated … but not all that quickly.

You’ve likely already read something this week about the Florida lawyer who was disbarred last month as the culmination of his “cumulative and escalating misconduct,” so I don’t know that I have anything truly unique to offer about the situation. But because I so clearly remember talking about the first event in his series of […]

Categories
Legal ethics

Preparing for disbarment.

The panel I was fortunate enough to participate in at the meeting of the Association of Professional Responsibility Lawyers in Vancover earlier this month has received a very good write up appearing in a Bloomberg Law publication.  You can go read it here.  We talked about a number of things other than the looming GDPR deadline, […]