Categories
. Legal ethics

Speaking again of rarer occurrences

Last week I dedicated a post to highlighting some topics of note that I hadn’t written about in a while.  This is another such post as the Tennessee Supreme Court has again taken action on its own initiative to increase discipline against an attorney beyond a result that both the accused attorney and the prosecuting […]

Categories
. Legal ethics

Hey Genis! Don’t do that.

I’ve represented a lot of lawyers over the years in disciplinary proceedings in Tennessee.  It is certainly fair to say that the process is slow when you want it to be fast and sometimes vice versa. I noticed a story that the ABA/BNA Lawyers’ Manual on Professional Conduct ran with that made me realize that the […]

Categories
. Legal ethics

Friday installment of “I beg to differ.”

It has been a long time since I have had reason to strongly disagree with the insights offered by Karen Rubin and company over at their excellent blog – The Law for Lawyers Today – but here we are again. Karen has written a thought-provoking piece about a criminal defense lawyer with a parody Twitter account and […]

Categories
. Legal ethics

Glitch in the TN disciplinary procedural rules?

I got a call a week or two ago from another Tennessee lawyer trying to noodle through a situation.  The caller was curious to see if I could offer any insight about why a situation that seemed a bit broken was not. I couldn’t.  Instead, I was able to sort of confirm for the lawyer […]

Categories
. Legal ethics

Rambling and bordering on incoherent is no way to do anything much less make a constitutional challenge.

I have made reference in the past on this blog about the problems that can come from the fact that Tennessee is one of a very few states that still use the “preponderance of the evidence” standard in disciplinary proceedings against lawyers.  Fewer than a dozen jurisdictions including Tennessee still use that standard.  Around forty U.S. […]